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tv   News 4 This Week  NBC  August 7, 2011 12:00pm-12:30pm EDT

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♪ welcome to "news4 this week." and hello, everyone. i'm wendy rieger. we're going to show you some of the more interesting local stories that made news this week. and among them -- >> i felt her come in, and i told my dad, she's coming out, she's coming out. >> a ride to the hospital takes too long for one baby, and a mother is forced to give birth in a d.c. traffic jam. what's your workout in one man drops half his weight. and d.c. is losing its status as one of the best places for singles. first today, a nightmare commute ends with a miracle for one family. a pregnant woman got stuck in traffic, she ended up having the baby in her car. craig melvin has more on this
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bumper-t bumper-to-bumper birth. >> reporter: she has only been on earth for seven hours, but this little girl already has the story of a lifetime. >> my daughter is having a baby. >> what's the address? >> reporter: the nervous father was on the phone with 911. his screaming daughter was in the passenger seat. her father was driving her to the hospital when there was a deadly accident here at new york and florida avenues. when traffic backed up, they were stuck. >> i put the seat back and just held on. >> i felt her coming, and i told my dad, she's coming out, she's coming out. so he's trying to keep me calm and trying to keep himself calm and trying to get us here safe. and i was like, oh, my god, i can't do this, and i started undressing in the car, because i felt her. >> the baby just came out. >> okay. what's the location? >> reporter: a perfectly healthy
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baby girl, born near a washington, d.c. intersection. mom is fine, too. in fact, the roadside birth was not as frightening for her as the prospect of something else. >> i wasn't scared, but i was just relieved from the pain, for one. and then i was excited, because i didn't want to have to have an induction. >> reporter: craig melvin, news4. >> she says she hardly noticed the traffic, and her new baby joins a 1-year-old brother. a new baseball field is now in the south germantown recreational park, and it was all made possible thanks to an organization that provides opportunities for people with mental and physical disabilities. melissa melai has their story. >> that's the way it goes. >> reporter: this is 9-year-old sage sing, field of dreams. >> it was fun. >> reporter: welcome to the washington nationals' miracle field, especially designed for kids with disabilities. many play in the miracle league. they can safely run in a wheelchair or walkers on the flat, cushion on the rubber
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field. the base pack is extra wide, the bases built into the ground. >> it was better than a regular field, because my wheels could go on it, wouldn't get stuck. >> reporter: just a year-and-a-half ago, sage was running the bases with his little league team. since then, he has been diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. >> it's giving me hope and encouragement to see the world is embracing kids with special needs. >> reporter: pitchers sean burnet and jordan zimmerman were on their side. >> what's your name? brady? i'm jordan. nice to meet you. >> reporter: even nationals' manager davy johnson, the day especially important for him. johnson raised two children with special needs. >> i've had some very proud moments in world series championships, but being a part of this today, i'm more proud of this. >> reporter: 8-year-old kiran spent his morning pushing his 14-year-old brother, conner, around the bases. >> he's always sitting on the sidelines when i play my sports, and now he gets to play his sports. >> reporter: dr. jim leeder had the idea for this field a few
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years back. the land is leased for $1 a year from park and planning, and he has raised more than $1 million in private donations. watching today -- >> there aren't any words. >> reporter: the field is complete. they would like to add a couple finishing touches. they would like a score board in the outfield, a permanent shaded area over the dugout, and a concession stand. they're hoping to get all of these things through donations. leeder knows the money will come, but for all these kids, the memories will last a lifetime. >> i think when i go home i'm going to cry. >> reporter: in germantown, melissa melai, news4. >> nice. there are 240 miracle leagues across our country. for more information, or how to donate to them, go to our website, nbcwashington.com. dozens of young people from our area are spending part of their summer vacation in cyberspace. kids are learning how to create new apps for iphones and ipads. derrick ward takes us to this high-tech camp that's at american university. >> many different options that
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can decide how you're going to play the game. >> reporter: who among us would not le to create their own world, create with whimsical beasts and landscapes? there's a little megalomaniac in all of us. now it used to be the domain of painters and writers, but now add computer programmers to the list of those who can lord over a universe of their own making. >> i like to connect to the game on a deeper level. >> reporter: for part of the summer on the campus of american university, young people learn how it's done in cyberspace. some of these kids at tech camp are already steeped? in computers, graphics and gaming. others are beginners, but they're here to learn. >> some kids are technologically inclined, interested in pursuing a path off the beaten trail. >> reporter: you have to make it fun, too. there are days when everybody assumes a character. that explains justin's cape. and this may look like child's play. it is in some respects, but there is more that went into the design of this robot.
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>> if it hits an object, it will bounce bann back. and then the programming gives it a measurement of how far away it is. >> reporter: pretty lofty stuff for preteens. >> it's going through the first stages. >> reporter: knew it tech camp, courses in designing ipad and iphone applications, experience that goes beyond gaming. >> we use things like photoshop that lots and lots of professionals use, so they're using real-world skills, problem solve, how to be creative. >> reporter: and even with a deadline, they don't lose sight of the fact that this is still a summer camp. >> i think it's a good balance between the time we spend on breaks or outside, so it's not just constant work all of the time. >> reporter: some of the campers say they want to pursue careers in computer programming and applications, and some don't envision it as more than a hobby. but regardless, they have one thing in common. >> i love this camp. >> reporter: derrick ward, news4. . >> the two-week camps are run by internal drive, and held at 60 of the country's top universities. the campers range in age from 7
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to 17. forbes.com has ranked two local cities near the top when it comes to smart tech-savvy individuals. d.c. is number seven on the site's list of 20 geekiest cities in the uds. a geek is defined with someone as a bachelor level education or higher with knowledge of science, engineering or other technical fields. bethesda comes in at nine. san jose, california tops the list, while ft. walton beach, florida closes out at number 20. and a new study shows d.c. has dropped as an ideal place for single ladies. singlemindedwomen.com analyzed cities across the country, and d.c. dropped from number two on last year's list to number five. cost of living, employment, outlook, and the city's male to female ratio contributed to this decline. a total of ten cities made that list. new york, number one. followed by chicago, boston and phoenix also beat out the district, coming in at third and fourth on the list. still ahead on "news4 this
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week" secret photos of metro riders are ending up online for anyone to see and the photographer is telling us why he's doing it. a cutting-edge treatment using dna to treat some of the deadliest forms of breast cancer. and how simple items you're planning to throw out can make [ male announcer ] are you watching cable? here's what you should be watching: your cable bill. because you could be paying way too much. stop spending more for second best. upgrade to verizon fios and get tv, internet and phone for our best price -- just $84.99 a month for a year -- only available online. go to verizon.com/greatprice to sign up, and save $360 in the first year. fios is a 100% fiber-optic network that delivers superior picture quality, more hd,
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plus america's fastest, most consistent, and most reliable internet. there's no annual contract required. why keep paying for cable? get fios tv, internet and phone for just $84.99 a month for a year -- our best price -- only available online. ordering online is easy. have questions? you can even chat live with a fios agent. so don't wait. visit verizon.com/great price. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities that's verizon.com/greatprice. at 800-974-6006 tty/v. fios. a network ahead.
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southeast d.c. is home to a new museum that celebrates
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islamic heritage. america's islamic heritage and cultural center is now opened. it's located near martin luther king avenue and morris road. the museum was created by a nonprofit organization in 1996, and began as a traveling exhibit called the collections and stories of american muslims. the exhibit reflects islamic history and culture that dates back to the 1500s. it is the 70th anniversary of the start of the tuskegee airmen, a group of african-american pilots who fought in world war ii. to celebrate, there was a meet and greet at andrews air force today. the spirit of tuskegee completed its cross-country flight to its new home at the smithsonian. it will go on display at the national museum of african-american history and culture. and we have still got weeks of summer left, and there are some easy ways to make your next barbecue less stressful. liz crenshaw turned to "real simple" magazine for some
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summertime tricks of the trade. >> reporter: nothing says summer like a make-your-own sundae. here's how to keep the toppings contained. the trick, an ice cube tray. make-your-own sundaes without the mess. here's another trick. service in citrus. cut an orange in half, scoop out the fruit, freeze the rind. a pretty and practical way to help keep the ice cream frozen. serving corn on the cob this summer? here's a trick for getting the silk off easily. an old toothbrush. we use coolers to keep things cold, but the next trick for corn on the cob, use the cooler to keep the corn hot. if you don't want your corn on the cob, use the bundt pan to hold the cob steady. it's a great colonel keviner. here's a trick to controlling
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your utensils. toss them in an oven mit and hang on the grill. use a cardboard six-pack for easy transport. packing glass bottles for a picnic? here's the trick. a kid's swim floaty. a great breakage buffer. need sliced strawberries for a fancy dessert? the trick, an egg slicer. super-simple slicing in no time. got a bug bite driving you crazy? here's the trick. a cool, used tea bag. it soothes the itch. here's a new use for an old stand-by. take your toothbrush holder and turn it into a flower vase. you get an evenly-spaced arrangement. got a bunch of expired sunscreen? here's the trick. use it as shaving lotion. it will protect your skin from razor burn. aloe verify asoothes summer
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sunburn. here's the trick to putting the fire out faster. freeze aloe vera in ice cube trays. popsicles for a summertime treat? the trick to controlling the drip: cupcake liners. liz crenshaw, news4. >> i love that segment. coming up, new hope in treating and beating some of the deadliest forms of breast cancer. cancer. a local man loses half his - nearly one in four children in this country cancer. a local man loses half his struggles with food insecurity. - feeding america helps provide food to 37 million people in need, including nearly 14 million children each year. - text "feedkids" to 50555 to donate $10 to feeding america. each $10 donation helps provide 70 meals to children in need. - join us in the fight to end child hunger in america. go to childhungerendshere.com to learn how to help. go to childhungerendshere.com to learn how to help.
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[ child's voice ] oocan i have some?od. [ child's voice ] you guys should rock, paper, scissors for it. ok.
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[ chuckles ] best of three? sure. one-two-three-shoot. one-two-three-shoot. [ scoffs ] one-two-three-shoot. one-two-three-shoot. one-two-three-shoot. one-two-three-shoot. i win! oh, man. [ muffled ] congratulations. [ male announcer ] get your own bbq pulled pork sub at subway®. tender, slow-cooked pork with irresistibly bold barbecue sauce. subway. eat fresh®. in news4 your health, it is the new trend in medical treatment, personalized medicine, where the type of therapy patients are given depends on their dna. now researchers at one local hospital are trying to find out if that could cure some of the most deadly forms of breast cancer. dorene gentzler reports. >> my grandmother had breast
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cancer. so because she had breast cancer, that was always a focus for me. like, i've always checked and i've always gotten just regular checks. >> reporter: even though kiona clark was well aware of her breast cancer risk, the 37-year-old was still shocked when she found a lump underneath her right arm. >> it was like you know that you're going to be okay, but at the same time, it kind of makes you try to accept the fact that you may not. >> reporter: clark was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, a disease that's known to be more aggressive and less responsive to standard treatment. her doctor didn't make her feel any better, either. >> she was just like, oh, my gosh, the worst kind you can ever have. >> reporter: but instead of dwelling on her cancer, she found hope at georgetown university medical center. >> i kind of felt like it was my duty, yeah. because it runs in my family, and i'm always for, i guess, trying to find a better way or, yeah, for people who may go through it also.
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>> reporter: the trial is called i-spy. its purpose is to investigate whether a tumor's dna can help determine what type of treatment patients should undergo. oncologist dr. lou is leading the research. >> it's smarter. it's the hope that we can avoid unnecessary side effects from drugs that won't work. and it's also hoping to speed things up to get the right drug to the right patient. >> reporter: right now, most breast cancer patients will undergo surgery first, then chemotherapy and possibly radiation. this trial is looking into whether using new types of drugs called biologicalics can help shrink tumors before patients ever get to surgery. the type of biologicalic a patient gets depends on the dna of their individual tumor. >> they target tumor cells with the help that then you have less side effects, because you're really honing on in on cancer cells. >> reporter: since april, she has been going through cancer therapy once a week, and taking
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a pill twice a day. the whole process has left her feeling pretty sick. but at the same time, doctors have been giving her mris so they can monitor how her tumor is responding to that treatment. >> like, you could literally see the first mri compared to the second mri and see the dichbs in the size. >> she has had a phenomenal response. >> reporter: dorene gentzler, news4. >> doctors say they can't feel kiona clark's tumor anymore, and they don't know whether or not it was the medication or the chemo. clark will still undergo a double mastectomy and have radiation. it can be really tough to start working out on your own. so imagine if you weigh 350 pounds. just how intimidating it would be to start a gym routine. but a man in virginia kicked his bad habits to the curb, and now he is literally half the man he used to be. so we asked him, "what's your workout?" >> my name is robert le master and i've lost 175 pounds through working out, exercising regularly, and changing my
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overall diet. 300 pounds. my knees were constantly hurting. would go up a flight of stairs and be out of breath. i would eat dinner, and be sweating, you know, because i had had high cholesterol, i had high blood pressure, and my diabetes was getting out of hand, basically. i wasn't exercising, and, you know, for dinner, i would call up the local sub place, hey, send me a foot long stick and cheese sub and order of cheese fries and mozzarella sticks and eat that. it came to the point where i was tired of sweating all of the time, tired of losing my breath just from going up a flight of stairs, and i couldn't walk more than five minutes without having to sit down and rest. in april, i got a membership here and started coming here once, twice, three times a week. just exercising more, and getting to a habit of, you know, sweating, basically, for the right reasons. i didn't know where to start, so i basically started on the recumbent bike, cycling 20 minutes a day. moved up the bike to about a
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half hour a day and started incorporating the elliptical. eventually i switched from the bike to using elliptical totally where i was up to 90 minutes a day on the elliptical. and i was doing that six days a week. in the evening, i was doing other exercises. basically, i was working out twice a day. bob's motivation was really unique. i wish more people will the motivation he had. i started shedding more weight. i mean, i dropped in two months, another 25 pounds. i lost about 8% of my body weight in those two months. so you can see the weight just falling off of him, every week, you could see a little bit of a change. >> i lost 175 pounds. something i would not -- thought would have happened, you know, two years ago. that's the biggest thing i've learned during this entire time. you've got to hold yourself accountable. because if you don't hold yourself accountable, you're not going to do what you need to do. >> wow. bob says another big factor in his weight loss was changing his diet. he stopped ordering out and started cooking for himself. that's what they say. coming up, why your face may
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be on the inte [ male announcer ] are you watching cable? here's what you should be watching: your cable bill. because you could be paying way too much. stop spending more for second best. upgrade to verizon fios and get tv, internet and phone for our best price -- just $84.99 a month for a year -- only available online. go to verizon.com/greatprice to sign up, and save $360 in the first year. fios is a 100% fiber-optic network that delivers superior picture quality, more hd, plus america's fastest, most consistent, and most reliable internet. there's no annual contract required. why keep paying for cable? get fios tv, internet and phone for just $84.99 a month for a year -- our best price -- only available online. ordering online is easy. have questions? you can even chat live with a fios agent. so don't wait. visit verizon.com/great price. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities that's verizon.com/greatprice. at 800-974-6006 tty/v. fios. a network ahead.
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[ child's voice ] can i have some? [ child's voice ] you guys should rock, paper, scissors for it. one-two-three-shoot. one-two-three-shoot. i win! oh, man. [ muffled ] congratulations. [ male announcer ] get your own subway® bbq pulled pork sub. slow-cooked pork with bold barbecue sauce.
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while donald trump has given up his bid for the white house, he could still end up on pennsylvania avenue. federal officials are considering several proposals to redevelop the old post office building on pennsylvania avenue, and trump's empire is one of the bidders. the building dates back to 1894. the federal general of services administration is now considering new uses for that property, including a high-end, 300-room hotel to be built by trump hotel collections. they expect to make a decision by november. so you're riding a metro train, and someone snaps a photo of you. later, posts that photo online. some say it's creepy. others say it's art. tom sherwood talked to the man behind a website that is got a lot of people talking. >> reporter: metro opens doors
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to hundreds of thousands of riders every day. and little do they know a handful of them may wind up here on the website called dcmetropeople, a collection of ordinary people just riding the rails. nothing obscene or embarrassing. >> i ride the metro every day, and i just wanted to capture what i see every day. >> reporter: meet 26-year-old ryan, a young professional from rural maryland who works in washington and now finds it his daily studio. >> in the evening, after work or on the weekends when they're done with their evening and going home. in the morning, it's hard, because it's cramped and you can't situate yourself. >> reporter: ryan uses an iphone to take pictures but asked us not to show his face, because he might be recognized, making it harder to snap his photos. transit riders were wary of the phantom photo taker. >> on the metro. >> reporter: there's a guy who goes around with a camera and puts it up on his website.
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nothing obscene, but just does it. >> that's a little creepy. that's a little weird. hopefully my picture is not on his website. >> reporter: just wonder what you think about that. >> i don't like the idea. i think they should ask first. >> reporter: okay. legally, he doesn't have to. but i looked at the pictures. they're nice pictures, not pictures of people do anything bad. >> i see. are you going to ask me if you can put this on tv? >> reporter: well, we didn't have to ask, either. but we did. ryan, the phantom photo taker says he often snaps a picture without directly looking at his subject. >> my ar i created it. i'm not breaking the law. it's no different than van gogh sitting in a cafe painting somebody. >> reporter: and with that, ryan headed back to metro after lunch to return to work and maybe take another photo or two. tom sherwood, news4, washington. >> metro says taking photographs in the system is legal, as long as the photographer doesn't interfere with other passengers or the operation of the trains. well, that's all for "news4
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this week", i'm wendy rieger. thank you for
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